‘My family of six lives in a hardware store, they use a bucket as a toilet and they love it’

it’s a Timid Life – but mother-of-four Jessica Taylor wouldn’t have it any other way.

In June 2020, after facing financial difficulties due to the pandemic, she and her husband, Lath, decided to ditch the amenities of their three-bedroom, two-bathroom home in Northwest Arkansas. The family of six moved into a 500-square-foot hardware store. Friends thought it was a very strange way to slim down.

“One of the things that people find really strange about us living in a shed is that we use a composting bathroom instead of a conventional toilet,” Taylor, 30, who now resides in a raised bungalow in West Tennessee, told The Post.

“It’s a bucket system,” the former waitress-turned-homeschooler (or school shed) explained of the outside house in her cottage. “And the [when] You are [urinate or defecate]You cover it with wood chips every time. After two days, whether the bucket is full or not, we empty it [the waste] In a compost bin in the woods, then two years later, [the waste] Turns into soil for ornamental plants. “

Facing financial problems caused by the pandemic, Taylor and her husband moved their family of six into a tool shed.
Facing financial problems caused by the pandemic, Taylor and her husband moved their family of six to a tool store.
Jessica Taylor

But indoor plumbing is one of the very few amenities that a family hostel lacks.

Taylor said, “The shed is two stories high and has electricity, running water, a heating/cooling system, a 65-inch flat screen TV, a stainless steel refrigerator, an electric stove and foldable butterflies that we use as beds.” She shared clips of her chic shack with more than 66,700 followers on social media.

After purchasing the wood workshop for $6,000 at a roadside hardware stall, she and Lath, 42, invested another $7,000 in the renovations, which included adding a staircase leading to his loft area, privacy walls and an outside porch.

Parents used money from tax returns, stimulus and unemployment checks to fund their housing project.

They also invested in a $4,000 well that would provide them with water for drinking, cleaning and bathing. (The family uses a tall, pull-out faucet that runs from their small kitchen to outside the shed, where they bathe under the tree cover.)

Taylor's husband added a staircase, privacy walls, an outside porch, and a second shed to their tiny home, which sits on an acre of her mother's property in West Tennessee.
Taylor’s husband added a staircase, privacy walls, an outside porch, and a second shed to their tiny home, which sits on an acre of her mother’s property in West Tennessee.
Jessica Taylor

Their brood, with children ages 3 to 9, is part of the growing number of people who are giving up sprawling and costly digs to live in outdoor storage units that usually contain gardening equipment or sporting goods. It’s a no-luxury take on the little house movement, with a dash of #VanLife for those looking for warm, economical simplicity. On TikTok, shed residents have stamped videos of their huts-turned-homes using the hashtag #ShedLife more than 22.2 million times.

“More and more people are breaking free from the mindset that you have to have an expensive luxury home to feel like they’re making it,” Taylor said of the allure of a secluded life. “There is value in living modestly. We can spend more time together gardening and enjoying nature rather than working to provide luxury accommodation.”

Taylor spent $6000 on the shed, and another $11,000 to renovate the space to make it comfortable for six.
Taylor spent $6000 on the shed and another $11,000 to renovate the space to make it comfortable for six.
Jessica Taylor

Our co-modernists Nick and Megan Lucid recently popped in to share how they transformed an 860-square-foot Tuff shed from Home Depot into a luxurious two-level estate, complete with one bedroom, finished bathroom, laundry, and laundry room. closet. Footage of their renovated cottage has recorded more than two million views.

Like Taylor, the couple has been downsizing for financial reasons caused by COVID.

“Immediately after the pandemic, Luth and I lost our jobs at a restaurant we’d worked at for years,” Taylor explained to The Post. “Before that, we were renting a huge $1,100 brick house in Arkansas, but we couldn’t afford it and our other household bills anymore.”

Taylor credited #ShedLife with helping her family get out of debt, and giving her the chance to become a homemaker mom.
Taylor credits #ShedLife for helping her family get out of debt and giving her the chance to become a stay-at-home mom.
Jessica Taylor

After moving in for eight hours and moving into her mother’s 6-acre property, where they put up a rent-free shed, the family’s monthly overheads were reduced from more than $2,000 to $400.

“Since we moved into the shed, we’ve been really financially stable, and we’ve been getting closer to being debt-free,” Taylor said, adding that the cost-effective move also allowed her to become a home mom resident. Even cutting their monthly expenses allowed them to purchase an $11,000 garden cottage to use as a second home.

“Children love [our new lifestyle] “Because we’re able to have more quality time together than when I was working,” Taylor said. “It was really cool.”

And #ShedLife isn’t just for families.

Millennials and Generation Z economists are now investing in cottages rather than apartments in order to save money and live close to home.
Millennials and Generation Z economists are now investing in cottages rather than apartments in order to save money and live close to home.
Mia Pohaca

Mia Pohaca, 17, got over the stress of looking for an apartment for the first time by setting up camp in her parents’ backyard.

“My dad and mom like to host me at home, so I don’t pay rent [while I’m living in the shed]Pohaca, a part-time office assistant from Ontario, Canada, told The Post. Clips from her humble home have garnered over 1.3 million views.

Her family purchased and renovated the 12-foot-by-24-foot structure for about $9,300 from Old Hickory Buildings shed dealers in 2019. Since then, Puhakka has decked out the space with cedar and birch floors and walls, a flat-screen TV and a working fireplace.

And when she needs to use the restroom, she travels a few feet to Mom and Dad. It is an ideal setting for someone who is about to reach adulthood.

“I get my own space without having to pay for an apartment or house, and I don’t pay for Wi-Fi or electricity because my roof is only connected to [parents’] Pohaca said.

#family #lives #hardware #store #bucket #toilet #love

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